Brown College of Court Reporting
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Founded in 1972, Brown College of Court Reporting is located in a large city with a population of more than 250,000. It is in the Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Roswell GA area.
Address
1100 Spring Street Suite 101
Atlanta, GA 30309
www.bccr.edu
Additional links
Programs offered by this school
Size corresponds to the number of graduates and color indicates field of study
Court Reporting
SOURCES:
Programs
This chart shows the number of graduates at all levels in the years shown for each discipline group. Look for a school with steady enrollment and focus in the areas that interest you most.
020406020142015201620172018
Court Reporting
Business/Office Automation/Technology/Data Entry
Award Levels
1-2 Year Certificate
2-4 Year Certificate
Quick Facts
Student Focus
Single-sex: women
Institutional Control
Brown College of Court Reporting is a private for-profit organization and is related to other schools.
Undergraduate Students
Full-time first-time students
Full-time transfer students
Part-time first-time students
Part-time transfer students
Accreditation
good
Accreditation provides important oversight over a school's instructional practices and institutional stability.
Brown College of Court Reporting holds an accreditation from one of the national accreditors. Credits earned from the national accreditors are often not accepted by schools holding the more prestigious regional accreditation, and it's important to verify that your credits will transfer if you are considering an eventual switch to another school.
Accreditation History
Council on Occupational Education (Accredited November 11, 1984 - present)
  • The accreditation was recently renewed on September 18, 2017.
  • The next accreditation review is scheduled for December 31, 2023.
  • A prior accreditation probation was resolved on June 13, 2019, and we believe the school should now be in compliance.
Student Attention
Context: Freshman satisfaction
Do most freshman choose to return for a sophomore year?
Context: Students per full-time instructor
Full-time faculty are mostly likely to be on campus and available for interaction, and to craft up-to-date courses and programs.
Context: Instructional expenditures per student
Although spending is not a guarantee of a good classroom experience, high spending can hint at a priority placed on quality in the classroom.
Students on campus
Study Types
About 20% of students are full-time. About 69% of students take all of their courses via distance education, while another 1% take some courses online.
Full-time
20%
Online classes
69%
Context: Student body size
Brown College of Court Reporting has 324 students.
SOURCES:
Graduation Rate
Approximately 20% of undergraduate students are full-time and about 22% of students are full-time first-time college students. In the last reporting year, 1% of students, inclusive of part-time and transfer students, received a degree within 8 years.
1%
Time to complete
4 years
6 years
8 years
Context: Graduation rate
These numbers reflect eight-year graduation rates for all degrees at the colleges and universities in your chosen context group. This reporting is for undergraduate students inclusive of transfer students and full/part-time students.
SOURCES:
Loan Status
This donut shows the percentage of students who are in good standing (green) in repaying any federal student loans five years after leaving Brown College of Court Reporting.
Status of loans
Closed (fully paid)
Currently paying
Suspended (usually for hardship)
In default
Not released due to privacy
Context: Loans with good standing
This performance is near the middle of the context schools.
student race/origin
Brown College of Court Reporting reports that 66% of students are minority, which is more than 72% of the context schools. This school's 0 of international students is near the middle proportion of international students within the context schools.
Race/Origin
White
Black
Hispanic
Asian
American Indian
SOURCES:
student gender
Is the gender balance of Brown College of Court Reporting students important to you? You can see the breakdown in this donut chart. For many context groups, the balance is not 50-50, so be sure to check out the context chart below.
Gender
Men
Women
Context: Percentage of women
Brown College of Court Reporting is a single-sex institution.
SOURCES:
Opportunities and Services
Does Brown College of Court Reporting offer good activities, services, and academic options for you? Here's what we found!
Undergraduate services offered

Academic/career counseling services

Employment services for current students

Placement services for program completers

Special academic opportunities

Weekend college

Undergraduate Student Satisfaction and Success
Student Satisfaction
Context: Percentage of students who return after their first year

If students come back for a second year, that suggests they are satisfied and able to succeed. The schools with satisfied freshmen should score above that dark gray 50% mark.

50%67%0%20%40%60%80%100%Full-timePart-time
Context: Percentage of students transferring out

How many people transfer out of Brown College of Court Reporting within 8 years of entering? If you're considering a school with lots of transfers, be sure to find out why it was a bad fit for so many other students!

5%0%20%40%60%80%100%
SOURCES:
Are students graduating on time?
Let us tell you all about low graduation rates!

Across the country, graduation rates are surprisingly low. In fact, Forbes Magazine suggests that they are unacceptably low. However, from another point of view, sometimes graduation rates simply reflect the relative preparation of the students who enter. Colleges with a mission to help people coming from less advantaged backgrounds, such as first-generation and low-income students, may have low graduation rates despite relatively strong outcomes for students who face many obstacles to success. Without the context provided in these views of completion rates, it can be tricky to separate predatory schools that take financial advantage of under-prepared students from those that are actively seeking to encourage and help those students.

For the consumer choosing a school, once you have narrowed your list to those schools that you can afford and that seem likely to admit you, consider the outcome measures in this section and choose the specific measures that best describe your plans. Very simply, schools with high graduation rates and high loan repayment rates will likely give you the best opportunity to succeed.

Choose a way to look at graduation rates
Rates with need context
Trends in rates
Rates by gender and race
Context: the impact of wealth and transfer status on degree completion

We took a close look lagging success for students with financial need in a case study. Here's a chance to compare schools based on student successes with a better appreciation of how circumstances may impact success. One word of caution: the statistics for some categories may consist of only a handful of students -- see the details by hovering or long-pressing on the bars.

Full-time first-time students
Full-time transfer students
Part-time first-time students
Part-time transfer students
Choose a student group
Full-time first-time students
Full-time transfer students
Part-time first-time students
Part-time transfer students
Percentage with Pell Grants
59%
Full-time first-time students who received a certificate within 4 years after enrolling
5%8%0%0%50%100%Non-PellPellAll
Full-time first-time students who received a certificate within 6 years after enrolling
5%8%0%0%50%100%Non-PellPellAll
Full-time first-time students who received a certificate within 8 years after enrolling
5%8%0%0%50%100%Non-PellPellAll
Do alumni earn enough to repay college loans?

Even if you don't need financial aid, the ability of past students to successfully repay loans speaks to the value of the education received.

Choose how to look at loan repayment
Five year overview
Loan defaults and burden
Success in loan repayment
Student groups and successful repayment
Where do alumni stand after five years?

This snapshot shows the status of students in their federal loan repayments in 2016, having departing from the school in 2012. The green wedges are the alumni in good standing, so look for a school with lots of green!

Student loan status
Closed (fully paid)
Currently paying
Suspended (usually for hardship)
In default
Not released due to privacy
Good standing in context

How does the percentage of students who fill those green wedges at Brown College of Court Reporting compare to other schools? The interactive bars below show you the distribution of how alumni at other schools are doing.

51%0%20%40%60%80%100%
Classroom Quality
Student attention at Brown College of Court Reporting

Schools are required to report the ratio of students per instructor, but look for a small number of students for every full-time instructor as your best indicator of personal attention and a modern well-integrated curriculum.

Context: Number of students per instructor
30.811020406080Full-time inst.Any inst.
Full-time and long-term instructors at Brown College of Court Reporting
Full-time faculty are mostly likely to be on campus and available for interaction, and to craft up-to-date courses and programs. Brown College of Court Reporting has 35% full-time instructors, and 67% of the context schools have a higher percentage of full-time instructors. Faculty with multi-year contracts provide additional stability and commitment to the school and its students. Within the full-time instructors at Brown College of Court Reporting, 100% have multi-year employment contracts. 95% of the context schools have a lower percentage of faculty with multi-year contracts.
Full-time instructors
35%
Long-term instructors
100%
SOURCES:
Faculty Diversity

Here's an opportunity to explore the faculty's diversity. For many schools, attracting a diverse teaching faculty can be a challenge. It's important to judge their success with the reality check of what their peer schools have accomplished.

Choose how to see faculty gender and race/origin
Overview
Context
Number of full-time instructors
The chart shows male instructors to the left, and female to the right, with the races/origins included along the bars. Select the context graph to see how this diversity profile compares to the schools that interest you.
White01234Men01234Women
SOURCES:
Student Body
Which students comprise the campus?

Who might be attending school with you? We'll look at what degrees most students have received, whether they are on campus or online, a little about their path, and the overall student body size. Our aim is to give some idea of what the campus culture might be.

See what degrees have been awarded

This donut chart shows you what degrees were awarded by Brown College of Court Reporting last year, and gives you a good idea of this school's focus. Make sure this school's focus matches your goals.

1-2 Year Certificate
2-4 Year Certificate
What percentage of students are online and not on campus?

There are performance problems with many online-focused schools -- you can read about this in an Ididio case study, but you may want some online options to give you greater flexibility.

Fall enrollment
050100150200250201320142015201620172018
No online courses
Some courses online
All courses online
Where are the other undergraduate students in their studies?

You will be most happy at a school with a large number of students who are like you, whether that's someone who enters right out of high school, or someone who is transferring, or someone who isn't ready to work towards a degree.

Degree-seeking: first-time
Degree-seeking: continuing
Degree-seeking: transfer-in
Non-degree-seeking
Student body size

Another breakdown that can help is a view of the student body size. Here we show student counts, including part-time versus full-time students. If the proportion of students that best describes you is relatively small, then is it possible that another school might be better-prepared to meet your needs?

050100150200
Part-time
Full-time
SOURCES:
Student race/origin

The NPR article A Campus More Colorful Than Reality: Beware That College Brochure emphasizes the importance of judging a school's diversity based on solid data as promotional materials are eager to suggest a multicultural student body.

Student race is only categorized for non-international students, and international students are listed separately.

Race/Origin
White
Black
Hispanic
Asian
American Indian
Choose a second viewpoint for student race and origin
Race/Origin in context
Race/origin over time
Context: Student race/origin
Here we offer some context as we compare diversity at Brown College of Court Reporting with that of the current context group.
57%34%7%1%1%0%20%40%60%80%100%Pacific IslanderMultiracialNot ReportedInternationalAmerican IndianAsianHispanicWhiteBlack
Student age distribution

The age distribution at a school can tell you a lot about its mission. If you're looking for a traditional undergraduate experience, you may prefer to see students who are mostly younger than 25 (lighter shades), but if you want support as a returning student, a large number of students 25 and older (darker shades) may better suit your needs.

Age range
20-21
22-24
25-29
30-34
35-39
40-49
50-64
65 and over
Choose another way to view age at Brown College of Court Reporting
Age in context
Age over time
Context: Age distribution
Seeing the age distribution in context lets us evaluate the focus at Brown College of Court Reporting compared to the focus for the context schools.
1%22%24%10%15%20%4%5%0%10%20%30%40%65 and over50-6440-4935-3930-3425-2922-2420-2118-19Under 18
SOURCES:
Student gender distribution
The donut shows the gender breakdown for students at Brown College of Court Reporting.
Why are genders so rarely 50-50?

There are multiple outside factors that can affect the gender balance of students recruited by schools. As an example, within less-affluent families higher education is more frequently attained by women than by men, a phenomenon explored in the Atlantic. Therefore, schools serving lower-income populations may be more likely to see a gender imbalance. On the other hand, some colleges may offer predominantly degrees that are stereotypically associated with a single gender, affecting the ratio of men to women accordingly.

Gender
Men
Women
Choose how to look at gender
Gender in context
Gender over time
Context: Gender Balance
It is very difficult for many types of schools to achieve a gender balance, and this context is valuable in evaluating the balance at Brown College of Court Reporting.
6%94%0%20%40%60%80%100%MenWomen
SOURCES:
Programs Offered
Court Reporting
A program that prepares individuals to record and transcribe examinations, testimony, judicial orders and instructions, legal opinions, and other formal proceedings via print or electronic methods. Includes instruction in legal terminology, legal transcription, shorthand, verbatim recording, equipment operation and procedures, applicable regulations, and professional standards and ethics

Note: The name and definition of this program are based on Department of Education CIP code descriptions, which ensures uniform reporting across schools in the US. Please check this school's website for detailed program information and their specific course descriptions.

Choose how to look at program completions
By Level
By Race/Origin
By Gender
Completions in Court Reporting by award level
010203040Number of graduates2009201020112012201320142015201620172018
2-4 Year Certificate
1-2 Year Certificate

Recently College Scorecard released data on starting salaries and cumulative federal student debt for each school/program combination with sufficient graduates to allow for privacy concerns with data releases. Shown in the box plots below are data for all schools offering legal support services (which may contain several related fields) by award level. If a value is reported for Brown College of Court Reporting, then that is shown in blue.

Starting Salaries
$0$10,000$20,000$30,000$40,000Bachelor'sAssociate'sCertificate
Cumulative Federal Student Loan Debt
$0$20,000$40,000$60,000Bachelor'sAssociate'sCertificate
Admissions
Admissions Overview

Here are some important dates and little tidbits. Please double-check this information on the Brown College of Court Reporting's webpage for the most up-to-date and accurate answers! We update this information with each school's annual reporting, but information can change unexpectedly. Select any item to view the details.

Admissions Criteria & Qualifications
Admissions Criteria & Qualifications
Application Fee & Common App
Application Fee & Common App
Brown College of Court Reporting has an undergraduate application fee of $50. We did not find Brown College of Court Reporting on the Common Application site. Keep in mind that it never hurts to inquire with an Admissions office to see whether they might be willing to waive your application fee.
Credits accepted from new students
Credits accepted from new students
Brown College of Court Reporting accepts the following credits:
  • Dual credit (college credit earned while in high school)
Applicant accepance and subsequent enrollment

Acceptance is a two-way street, because while you may be concerned about whether or not your favorite school will accept you, the colleges and universities are equally worried about whether you will attend if accepted.

Percentage of applicants who are accepted
A low percentage here can indicate that a school is highly selective. We think this is one of the least important numbers for you to consider.
Selectivity can be misleading

You may have heard that a high rejection rate is an indicator of a good school. However, this number can be gamed, and some schools started gaming the system to perform better in college ratings books and sites. Ididio believes a combination of good outcomes (e.g. successful graduation rates and loan repayments) along with indicators of a well-prepared student body (e.g. test scores and high school records) are the best indicators of a good academic experience for those who attend. Our advice is that you don't pay too much attention to this number as you decide whether you might be admitted.

100%0%20%40%60%80%100%WomenMen
Percentage of accepted students who choose to attend

This is called the yield, and it suggests whether this was a first-choice school or a back-up school for most applicants. Even the most prestigious Ivy League schools lose about a third of their accepted students come enrollment time.

75%0%20%40%60%80%100%WomenMen
SOURCES:
Costs and Financial Aid
Historic Annual Costs

See how this school's published costs have changed over the year, and how their cost trends compare with other private schools.

Published costs may have little to do with what you actually pay

It's important to remember that a school's published costs may not be indicative of what it will actually cost to attend. Time magazine wrote about this in their article Yes, you can get a college to cut its tuition price. Nonetheless, this inflation-adjusted look at the historic annual costs for tuition, fees, books, and supplies can give you an idea of the costs you might expect in the coming years. Comparing the total costs inclusive of room and board (if applicable) with the annual net price estimates in the previous tab will help you determine the financial aid package to expect.

Private and public universities' charges are difficult to compare due to the in-state and out-of-state price differences of public universities, and therefore we only compare Brown College of Court Reporting to other private schools within your chosen context group.

Undergraduate tuition, fees, books, and supplies over time
20112012201320142015201620172018$0$10,000$20,000$30,000$40,000
Chart explanation
Brown College of Court Reporting
On the blue curve, we see how the published annual cost to attend Brown College of Court Reporting has changed over the years.
Context Schools
The shading shows the spread of the annual cost for the context schools. The dark shading shows the middle 50% of context schools, and the light shading shows all but the smallest and largest 10%.
Customize your context group using the gear at the top of the page!
Current published costs

Here's a quick summary of costs to attend Brown College of Court Reporting. You will find the most up-to-date information at their website for admissions.

Undergraduate costs
Charge
Annual fees
Annual tuition
Estimated books and supplies
Miscellaneous (living off campus)
Miscellaneous (living with family)
Off-campus room and board
Per-credit charges
Cost
$495
$12,450
$2,205
$8,772
$10,785
$13,464
$345
SOURCES:
Financial aid overview

Understanding the rules and process that determine who gets financial aid can be intimidating. Here are some quick links to help:

  • Visit Brown College of Court Reporting's Net Price Calculator for the most accurate estimate of your anticipated costs. Every school publishes a Net Price Calculator that does its best to give you a fair estimate of what you might expect to pay. Many calculators consider your high school record as part of the calculation. This will be far more accurate than any of the averages or published tuition values that you see here.

  • FederalStudentAid, a government site that will walk you through the federal financial aid process. There are a number of kinds of student loans and other aid, and this site can walk you through all of the choices you will need to make.

Campus overview
No Student Housing Available

This school does not report any housing for students.

SOURCES:
School finances
Brown College of Court Reporting: What its budget can tell you about classroom quality

Where a school spends and collects its money can suggest a lot about the educational experience it offers. The tabs below offer a look at spending that is important for the quality of your experience if you attend.

Choose Classroom aspect
Instructional spending
Student services spending
Context and trends: Instructional expenditures per student

Instructional expenses are primarily the salary and benefits paid to the heart of a school: its full-time instructors. High expenditures in this area suggest care in hiring enough highly qualified full-time faculty to provide personal attention and up-to-date subject-area excellence.

200720082009201020112012201320142015201620172018$0$5,000$10,000$15,000
Chart explanation
Brown College of Court Reporting
On the blue curve, we see how the instructional expenses per student at Brown College of Court Reporting have changed over the years.
Context Schools
The shading shows the spread of the instructional expenses per student for the context schools. The dark shading shows the middle 50% of context schools, and the light shading shows all but the smallest and largest 10%.
All values have been adjusted for inflation. Customize your context group using the gear at the top of the page!
Does Brown College of Court Reporting have stable finances?
You want to attend schools that can meet their annual expenses, and have other indicators of strong financial health.
Should this school's stability matter to you?

You can find a myriad of articles about the enrollment crises expected across US colleges and universities due to fewer births during the 2008 recession and other demographic shifts. The end result to you is that you need to protect your college investment by researching the financial stability of schools that you are considering. Many of our metrics are based on the excellent advice of Forbes' Financial Health Grades.

Ididio does not want to see you stuck with debt and no degree.

Choose budget aspect
Core operating margin
Net assets per student
Tuition dependence
Government appropriations
Context and trends: Core operating margin

The core operating margin is the percentage by which core revenues exceed (or, when negative, fall short of) core expenses, so higher is better here. This margin excludes finances for non-academic expenses such as housing, hospitals, or other independent operations. For schools with large endowments, this measure can be volitile from year-to-year without indicating concern because investment losses and gains are driving this figure, but if an institution's margin is trending downwards or consistently negative, you should be concerned.

200720082009201020112012201320142015201620172018-40%-20%0%20%40%
Chart explanation
Brown College of Court Reporting
On the blue curve, we see how the core operating margin at Brown College of Court Reporting have changed over the years.
Context Schools
The shading shows the spread of the core operating margin for the context schools. The dark shading shows the middle 50% of context schools, and the light shading shows all but the smallest and largest 10%.
All values have been adjusted for inflation. Customize your context group using the gear at the top of the page!
Does incoming revenue consistently cover expenses?

Brown College of Court Reporting is a private for-profit school, meaning that its annual goal is to make a profit for its shareholders. The other types of schools are public or not-for-profit, and profit is not a goal.

Total revenue and expenses by category

We divided revenue and expenses for Brown College of Court Reporting into categories to give some insight to what may have influenced peaks and ditches in the chart above. The purple shades correspond most directly to student education. The blue shades, auxiliary expenses and revenue, are often related to room and board. We show investment gains and losses in apricot.

200720082009201020112012201320142015201620172018$0$1M$2M$3M$4MRevenue$0$1M$2M$3M$4MExpense
Investment gains
Auxiliary revenue
Tuition and fees revenue
Government appropriations etc.
Educational sales revenue
Other revenue
Auxilliary expenses
Instructional expenses
Student services expenses
Academic & instructional support, student services expenses
Academic support expenses
Institutional support expenses
Other expenses