Charlotte Christian College and Theological Seminary
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Overview
Founded in 1996, Charlotte Christian College and Theological Seminary is located in a large city with a population of more than 250,000. It is in the Charlotte-Concord-Gastonia NC-SC area.
Highlights
Undergraduate program with the highest reported starting salary (): Bible/Biblical Studies
Largest undergraduate program (3): Biblical Studies
Address
7520 East Independence Blvd Suite 100
Charlotte, NC 28227
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Accreditation:
good
Institutional Control
Charlotte Christian College and Theological Seminary is a private not-for-profit organization.
Student Focus
Predominantly Black College or University
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Accreditation
Accreditation provides important oversight over a school's instructional practices and institutional stability.
Charlotte Christian College and Theological Seminary holds an accreditation from one of the national accreditors. Credits earned from the national accreditors are often not accepted by schools holding the more prestigious regional accreditation, and it's important to verify that your credits will transfer if you are considering an eventual switch to another school.
Accreditation History
Transnational Association of Christian Colleges and Schools, Accreditation Commission (Accredited November 5, 2003 - present)
  • The next accreditation review was scheduled for December 31, 2023.
Undergraduate Students
Not all students attend their first college full time to completion. While some schools are focused on those that population, many schools focus on transfer and or part time students. What types of of student does this school support.
Full-time first-time students
Full-time transfer students
Part-time first-time students
Part-time transfer students
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Admissions
Open Admissions
Charlotte Christian College and Theological Seminary is an open admissions school and accepts any student who applies.
SOURCES:
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Admissions Details
Here are some important dates and little tidbits. Please double-check this information on the Charlotte Christian College and Theological Seminary's webpage for the most up-to-date and accurate answers! We update this information with each school's annual reporting, but information can change unexpectedly. Select any item to view the details.
Admissions Criteria & Qualifications
Admissions Criteria & Qualifications
Charlotte Christian College and Theological Seminary lists the following admissions priorities and requirements:
Very Important: religious affiliation/commitment and character/personal qualities
Important: recommendation(s), level of applicant's interest, and volunteer work
Considered: work experience, application essay, and geographical residence
Not Considered: rigor of secondary school record, class rank, racial/ethnic status, academic GPA, first generation, alumni/ae relation, extracurricular activities, state residency, talent/ability, and standardized test scores
A high school diploma or GED is required, and an international baccalaureate is accepted.
Application Fee & Common App
Application Fee & Common App
Charlotte Christian College and Theological Seminary has an undergraduate application fee of $50. We did not find Charlotte Christian College and Theological Seminary on the Common Application site. Keep in mind that it never hurts to inquire with an Admissions office to see whether they might be willing to waive your application fee.
Freshman application dates
Freshman application dates
Charlotte Christian College and Theological Seminary has a rolling admissions policy without deadlines. This school notifies applicants of acceptance as they process applications.
Transfer application information
Transfer application information
Charlotte Christian College and Theological Seminary has a rolling transfer admissions policy without deadlines. Applicants are notified as applications are processed. Transfer students can begin studies in fall, spring or summer.
Credits accepted from new students
Credits accepted from new students
Charlotte Christian College and Theological Seminary accepts the following credits:
  • Transfer credits from accredited institutions
  • ACE recommendations for credit
  • Open admission (school accepts any student who applies)
  • Dual credit (college credit earned while in high school)
  • Advanced placement (AP) credits
Programs
Charlotte Christian College and Theological Seminary program offerings
What award level are you pursuing?
Bachelor's Degree
Select a degree to see the details, or use the sankey below to explore the options.
Select a degree
Order degrees by.
Program Size (Completions)
Charlotte Christian College and Theological SeminaryBiblical StudiesUrban MinistryTop 10 matching degrees
Humanities
Costs
Undergraduate costs
Here's a quick summary of costs to attend Charlotte Christian College and Theological Seminary. You will find the most up-to-date information at their website for admissions.
View
All
Charge
Annual fees
Annual tuition
Estimated books and supplies
Miscellaneous (living off campus)
Miscellaneous (living with family)
Off-campus room and board
Per-credit charges
Cost
$320
$10,350
$560
$6,724
$4,681
$10,350
$465
SOURCES:
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Historic Annual Costs
See how this school's published costs have changed over the years, and how their cost trends compare with other private schools.
Published costs may have little to do with what you actually pay

It's important to remember that a school's published costs may not be indicative of what it will actually cost to attend. Time magazine wrote about this in their article Yes, you can get a college to cut its tuition price. Nonetheless, this inflation-adjusted look at the historic annual costs for tuition, fees, books, and supplies can give you an idea of the costs you might expect in the coming years. Comparing the total costs inclusive of room and board (if applicable) with the annual net price estimates in the previous tab will help you determine the financial aid package to expect.

Private and public universities' charges are difficult to compare due to the in-state and out-of-state price differences of public universities, and therefore we only compare Charlotte Christian College and Theological Seminary to other private schools within your chosen context group.

Undergraduate tuition, fees, books, and supplies over time
20122013201420152016201720182019$0$10,000$20,000$30,000$40,000$50,000
Chart explanation
Charlotte Christian College and Theological Seminary
On the blue curve, we see how the published annual cost to attend Charlotte Christian College and Theological Seminary has changed over the years.
Context Schools
The shading shows the spread of the annual cost for the context schools. The dark shading shows the middle 50% of context schools, and the light shading shows all but the smallest and largest 10%.
Customize your context group using the gear at the top of the page!
Financial Aid
Student Financial Need
How likely are you to get a scholarship if you attend? This section covers the likelihood that students with or without need are receiving financial aid. You can see this data for the full-time degree-seeking undergraduate student population as a whole or for full-time freshmen only.
Choose a student group
Full-time undergraduates
Full-time freshmen
Context: Need met for full-time undergraduates
Charlotte Christian College and Theological Seminary uses federal methodology to determine if a student needs aid. According to their benchmark, they believe that 100% of full-time degree-seeking undergraduate need has been met. In general, the funds that close the gap between the cost of attendance (COA) and the expected family contribution (EFC) is filled by student loans, but some schools distribute enough financial aid to make sure this is not necessary. Visit the financial aid website to explore what promises Charlotte Christian College and Theological Seminarymakes.
100%0%20%40%60%80%100%
Overview of student need and resources used (Full-time degree-seeking undergraduate students)
The average annual financial aid package received by full-time degree-seeking undergraduates who were identified to have need totals $3,996, of which on average $2,105 is in the form of loans.
Student financial need
Have need
No need
0%20%40%60%80%100%Percentage with aid by typeNeed-based GrantsNeed-based self-helpNon-need-based Grants
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Financial aid overview

Understanding the rules and process that determine who gets financial aid can be intimidating. Here are some quick links to help:

  • Visit Charlotte Christian College and Theological Seminary's Net Price Calculator for the most accurate estimate of your anticipated costs. Every school publishes a Net Price Calculator that does its best to give you a fair estimate of what you might expect to pay. Many calculators consider your high school record as part of the calculation. This will be far more accurate than any of the averages or published tuition values that you see here.
  • FederalStudentAid, a government site that will walk you through the federal financial aid process. There are a number of kinds of student loans and other aid, and this site can walk you through all of the choices you will need to make.

Applicants are notified of results on a rolling basis beginning January 15 and must respond within 2 weeks.

Required Forms

FAFSA

Loan Programs

Federal Direct PLUS

Federal Direct Subsidized Stafford

Federal Direct Unsubsidized Stafford

Need-based Scholarships Available

Federal Pell Grants

Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants

Private scholarships/grants

Institutional scholarships/grants

Athletic scholarships

Non-need-based Scholarships Available

Academic interest/achievement grants

Athletic scholarships

International Students
Charlotte Christian College and Theological Seminary provides need-based aid in the form of state and other work-study aid and institutional grants.
Not so much?
Cumulative student loans
The student loan data in this section is compiled for the most recent graduating class at , and provides total debt incurred while attending.
Student loan type
The bars below give you a peek at what types of loans students took out most frequently. Using the tab, you can view the average amounts of each type of loan.
0%20%40%60%80%100%FederalStatePrivateInstitution
Average student loan amounts
The bars below show the average cumative amount corresponding to each type of loan. Use the tabs above to see the percentages of students using each type of loan.
$0$10K$20K$30K$40KFederalStatePrivateInstitution
Undergraduate Outcomes
Graduation Rate
Approximately 51% of undergraduate students were full-time with about 14% of them attending college for the first time. In the last reporting year, 26% of students, including those who were part-time or transfer students, received a degree within 8 years.
26%
Time to complete
4 years
6 years
8 years
Context: Graduation rate
These numbers reflect eight-year graduation rates for all degrees at the colleges and universities in your chosen context group. This reporting is for undergraduate students inclusive of transfer students and full/part-time students.
SOURCES:
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Are students graduating on time?
Let us tell you all about low graduation rates!

Across the country, graduation rates are surprisingly low. In fact, Forbes Magazine suggests that they are unacceptably low. However, from another point of view, sometimes graduation rates simply reflect the relative preparation of the students who enter. Colleges with a mission to help people coming from less advantaged backgrounds, such as first-generation and low-income students, may have low graduation rates despite relatively strong outcomes for students who face many obstacles to success. Without the context provided in these views of completion rates, it can be tricky to separate predatory schools that take financial advantage of under-prepared students from those that are actively seeking to encourage and help those students.

For the consumer choosing a school, once you have narrowed your list to those schools that you can afford and that seem likely to admit you, consider the outcome measures in this section and choose the specific measures that best describe your plans. Very simply, schools with high graduation rates and high loan repayment rates will likely give you the best opportunity to succeed.

Context: the impact of wealth and transfer status on degree completion
We took a close look lagging success for students with financial need in a case study. Here's a chance to compare schools based on student successes with a better appreciation of how circumstances may impact success. One word of caution: the statistics for some categories may consist of only a handful of students -- see the details by hovering or long-pressing on the bars.
Full-time first-time students
Full-time transfer students
Part-time first-time students
Part-time transfer students
Choose a student group
Full-time first-time students
Full-time transfer students
Part-time first-time students
Part-time transfer students
Percentage with Pell Grants
83%
Years after enrolling.
4
6
8
Full-time first-time students who received an award within 8 years after enrolling
40%0%33%0%50%100%Non-PellPellAll
Context and trends: Repayment Rate
How much progress do you think you'll be able to make towards paying down your college loans seven years after leaving school? In our research, we discovered that a surprisingly large number of students don't default on their loans, but also aren't making progress in paying down their principal amount. The percentages here count alumni who have decreased their loan amounts by at least $1.
Years after leaving school.
3
0%20%40%60%80%100%Former students with decreased loan principal
Chart explanation
Charlotte Christian College and Theological Seminary
On the blue curve, we see the percentage of alumni from Charlotte Christian College and Theological Seminary who have successfully reduced their federal school loans by at least $1 by the date shown, which is 3 years after leaving the school.
Context Schools
The shading shows the spread of the loan repayment rate for the context schools. The dark shading shows the middle 50% of context schools, and the light shading shows all but the smallest and largest 10%.
Customize your context group using the gear at the top of the page!
Context and trends: are the loan default rates as small as possible?
The default rate is the percentage of students who are already delinquent on their loans within three years of leaving the school. If a school has a high default rate, that sends an alarm out that the students' educations are not sufficient to earn enough to repay those loans. Read below for details on the typical loan burden, and keep in mind that a low default rate may be more important than loan amounts in predicting your future success.
201420152016201720180%5%10%15%20%25%Former students with loan payment failure
Chart explanation
Charlotte Christian College and Theological Seminary
On the blue curve, we see the percentage of alumni from Charlotte Christian College and Theological Seminary who have defaulted on their federal school loans within 3 years ending on the date shown.
Context Schools
The shading shows the spread of the 3-year loan default rate for the context schools. The dark shading shows the middle 50% of context schools, and the light shading shows all but the smallest and largest 10%.
Customize your context group using the gear at the top of the page!
Loan burden
At Charlotte Christian College and Theological Seminary, 0% of full-time degree-seeking freshmen receive federal student loans. We have much more details about the full loan burden students experience in our Cost and Financial Aid Section.
Context: Percentage of freshmen with federal loans
0%0%20%40%60%80%100%
Not so much?
Classroom Experience
Student attention at Charlotte Christian College and Theological Seminary
Schools are required to report the ratio of students per instructor, but look for a small number of students for every full-time instructor as your best indicator of personal attention and a modern well-integrated curriculum.
12.9501020304050Full-time inst.Any inst.
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Full-time and long-term instructors at Charlotte Christian College and Theological Seminary
Full-time faculty are mostly likely to be on campus and available for interaction, and to craft up-to-date courses and programs. Charlotte Christian College and Theological Seminary has 29% full-time instructors, and 79% of the context schools have a higher percentage of full-time instructors. Faculty with multi-year contracts provide additional stability and commitment to the school and its students.Within the full-time instructors at Charlotte Christian College and Theological Seminary, none have multi-year employment contracts. Of the context schools, 72% have instructors with multi-year contracts.
Full-time instructors
29%
Long-term instructors
0%
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Housing
No Student Housing Available
This school does not report any housing for students.
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Activities and Services
Special academic opportunities
  • Cooperative program
  • Distance learning
  • Double-major allowed
  • Formal adult program
  • Independent study courses
  • Orientation program
  • Part-time degree programs
  • Services for learning disabilities
  • Summer session
Undergraduate services offered
  • Remedial services
  • Academic/career counseling services
  • Employment services for current students
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Programs for Veterans
If you are a veteran, it's worth digging around to find a military-friendly campus. We think this article about how colleges might help veterans might be a good starting point for questions to ask the Admissions office before you choose to attend. It's also good to be aware that many for-profit schools are behaving as predators, hungry for GI Bill dollars. Watching out for those schools is no different for veterans than for all students: judge very critically using our "Student Satisfaction and Success" tab for undergraduate programs. We wish we had the same data to support graduate programs; however, we think the undergraduate data is a good starting point for judging overall quality.
  • Credit for Military Training
  • Yellow Ribbon Program
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Research
The library is the backbone of academic learning and research

A rigorous academic program requires that students and faculty alike are engaging in independent research, and that activity requires strong library support. You can get some useful information here:

  • How strong and how balanced between traditional physical books and easily-accessed (but expensive) electronic journals and other resources is this library?
  • How much is this library borrowing from other libraries? The number of interlibrary loans received can indicate the school's commitment to getting the resources on-campus researchers need, and also of the research activity on campus.
  • How big a resource is this library to other libraries? A large number of outgoing interlibrary loans speaks highly of the value of its content.

The presence of a library in and of itself is a good thing. Increasingly, libraries are comfortable and inviting spaces for individual and group study sessions. Librarians can be incredibly friendly guides in your quest to find materials that aid your learning.

Comparison of library resources per student
How do the per-student library resources at Charlotte Christian College and Theological Seminary compare to other schools?
460190200400600PhysicalElectronic
Comparison of library loans per student
A small library could make up for a small collection by allowing a large number of interlibrary loans to be received. An excellent library can show its strength by its number of loans given.
0.000.000.001.002.00LoanedReceived
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Research funding: the best indicator of post-baccalaureate academic rigor
Any school that reports at least $150,000 in research and development expenditures in a given year should have submitted out the Higher Education Research and Development (HERD) survey to the National Science Foundation (NSF). We did not find HERD data for $Charlotte Christian College and Theological Seminary, so there would at most modest graduate-level academic scholarship campus-wide.
Student Body
Undergraduate Study Types
About 44% of undergraduate students are full-time. About 52% of undergraduate students take all of their courses via distance education, while another 38% take some courses online.
Undergraduate Full-time
44%
Undergraduate Online classes
90%
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Context: Student body size
Charlotte Christian College and Theological Seminary enrolled 101 students over the past academic year. The the student body size is smaller than 96% of the context schools.
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Undergraduate student gender
Is the gender balance of Charlotte Christian College and Theological Seminary undergraduate students important to you? You can see the breakdown in this donut chart.
Gender
Men
Women
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Undergraduate student race/origin
Charlotte Christian College and Theological Seminary reports that 90% of undergraduate students are minority, which is more than 92% of the context schools. This school's 1.9% of international students representing 8 countries is near the middle proportion of international students within the context schools.
Race/Origin
White
Black
Hispanic
Asian
International
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Fewer details
Context: Gender Balance
It is very difficult for many types of schools to achieve a gender balance, and this context is valuable in evaluating the balance at Charlotte Christian College and Theological Seminary.
35%65%20%40%60%80%MenWomen
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Context: Percentage of women
With 65% women undergraduate students, Charlotte Christian College and Theological Seminary has a higher percentage of women than 71% of context schools.
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Context: Undergraduate student race/origin
Here is how Charlotte Christian College and Theological Seminary compares to the rest of the context group in terms of diversity in the student race and origin.
87%8%2%2%2%0%20%40%60%80%100%Pacific IslanderAmerican IndianMultiracialNot ReportedHispanicAsianInternationalWhiteBlack
Freshman residences

A high proportion of international and out-of-state students speaks to reputation and offers an opportunity for diverse interactions in and out of class.

Charlotte Christian College and Theological Seminary has undergraduates from 9 states or territories and 8 countries.

Freshman residence
In-state
Out-of-state
International
Not Reported
Undergraduate student age distribution
The age distribution at a school can tell you a lot about its mission. If you're looking for a traditional undergraduate experience, you may prefer to see students who are mostly younger than 25 (lighter shades), but if you want support as a returning student, a large number of students 25 and older (darker shades) may better suit your needs.
Age range
18-19
22-24
25-29
30-34
35-39
40-49
50-64
65 and over
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School Finances
Charlotte Christian College and Theological Seminary: What its budget can tell you about classroom quality
Where a school spends and collects its money can suggest a lot about the educational experience it offers. The tabs below offer a look at spending that is important for the quality of your experience if you attend.
Instructional spending
Student services spending
Context and trends: Instructional expenditures per student
Instructional expenses are primarily the salary and benefits paid to the heart of a school: its full-time instructors. High expenditures in this area suggest care in hiring enough highly qualified full-time faculty to provide personal attention and up-to-date subject-area excellence.
200720082009201020112012201320142015201620172018$0$5,000$10,000$15,000$20,000
Chart explanation
Charlotte Christian College and Theological Seminary
On the blue curve, we see how the instructional expenses per student at Charlotte Christian College and Theological Seminary have changed over the years.
Context Schools
The shading shows the spread of the instructional expenses per student for the context schools. The dark shading shows the middle 50% of context schools, and the light shading shows all but the smallest and largest 10%.
All values have been adjusted for inflation. Customize your context group using the gear at the top of the page!
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Does incoming revenue consistently cover expenses?

Charlotte Christian College and Theological Seminary is a private not-for-profit school. Along with publicly-controlled schools, not-for-profit schools do not have the goal of annual profit, but they do want to have healthy finances with adequate revenue to meet all expenses. On the other hand, private for-profit schools have creating a profit for shareholders as an annual goal.

Total revenue and expenses by category
We divided revenue and expenses for Charlotte Christian College and Theological Seminary into categories to give some insight to what may have influenced peaks and ditches in the chart above. The purple shades correspond most directly to student education. The blue shades, auxiliary expenses and revenue, are often related to room and board. We show investment gains and losses in apricot.
200720082009201020112012201320142015201620172018$0$500K$1M$1.5M$2MRevenue$0$500K$1M$1.5M$2MExpense
Investment gains
Tuition and fees revenue
Government appropriations etc.
Private and capital gifts
Other revenue
Investment losses
Instructional expenses
Student services expenses
Academic support expenses
Institutional support expenses
Other expenses
Not so much?
The power of a large endowment
Related to the previous question of whether the annual revenue stream is stable is the question, "How deep are this school's pockets?" For many schools, a major source of annual income is investment growth. Schools with large endowments have a built-in revenue stream, although you'll see in the accompanying graphs that this revenue stream is highly dependent on the nation's economy. You can choose how to examine the depth of Charlotte Christian College and Theological Seminary's resources by selecting from the buttons below.
Choose asset category
Net Assets
Net Assets Per Student

Here we examine assets at Charlotte Christian College and Theological Seminary in context, and it seems most fair to adjust for the size of the institution. We examine the assets per full-time-equivalent student so that we level the playing field for size.

There's a catch to these assets, though. Many gifts to a school's endowment have strings attached; the money is restricted to a specific purpose. Assets shown in green below are unrestricted, and are very important to a school's ability to meet its financial obligations. Some assets are the land and buildings that a school must have in order to function, and these may appear as green (unrestricted assets) but are nonetheless less helpful in meeting annual financial commitments. This look at assets is only a piece of the puzzle as we decide if a school is stable.

$0$20,000$40,000$60,000200720082009201020112012201320142015201620172018
Restricted net assets
Unrestricted net assets
Context: 2019 net assets per student